Tag Archives: Walmart

Raffle THIS!

It takes quite a bit to make me angry. Really. Jack and I have developed an even-keeled, let it flow quality of life that we enjoy.

But if you DO want to make me mad, take some decent, kind-hearted people seeking to do good in their community, pit them against a corporation in the same community sucking the economic lifeblood out of it, and throw in some condescending rudeness.

That’s pretty much guaranteed to work.

elissa kissing dachshundMy friend Elissa (yeah, the one who shoots kittens and paraplegic puppies) is spearheading a raffle for IN HIS HANDS SMALL ANIMAL RESCUE. Elissa currently has several fosters for IHH, including Hope, a dachshund who needs a cart because her back legs are paralyzed.

Unsuspecting, good-hearted Elissa went to Walmart the other day, and–crivens jings–left her door unlocked. When she returned, her glove box had been rifled, her seats moved, and the bag containing $40 and the stubs of raffle tickets she’d sold were missing.

She called Walmart and asked to see the video tape of the cameras they have in the parking lot, and told us the manager on the phone informed her that they didn’t want their customers alarmed with rumors of parking lot thefts, and why hadn’t she locked her car, rather than invite this type of crime?

So customer-minded. One can see clearly how much Walmart cares. They don’t want to upset anyone. Except the lady on the phone whose car was burgled. the bag

The bag was turned in to the front desk of Walmart, sans money. The money has been made up by local people who hate that this happened–and who don’t plan on shopping at the Norton, VA Walmart any more. The security tape has been appropriated by the police, who are investigating the theft.

And the raffle is going forward. This is Buddy, our cleaning lady Heather’s dog. Buddy is from IHH, and Elissa found him for Heather. He’s really quite something, as you can see. Buddy

If you’re not in the area but would like to participate in the raffle, send a $5 check per ticket and the name and contact details for the person you want the ticket for. The iPad will be raffled once 450 tickets are sold. I think they were at 220 when the theft occurred. You can send raffle purchases here to the bookstore, and we’ll hold your half of the stub here. We’ll notify everyone of the winner by blog, and Hope will get her cart. And, hopefully, Walmart will get a clue.

The address is Tales of the Lonesome Pine Used Books, 404 Clinton Ave E, Big Stone Gap, VA 24219. Thanks, y’all.

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Filed under small town USA, Uncategorized, VA

Bouncing off the Bars

People can get priggish or preachy about the whole “shop local” thing, but it really does have a positive impact. I bought a hank of homespun wool from a friend for $25; she spent $15 at the local craft shop and $10 buying books from me. I had supper at the buffet across the street; the craft shop owner bought cupcakes from the local bakery for her son’s birthday. “Follow the money” as ’round and ’round and ’round it goes, keeping us in business for ourselves–and each other.

What if I’d gone to Walmart instead and bought $25 worth of Red Heart–which would have been a whole 28 oz. more of crocheting material?

More yarn, less community. Thank you, but I’ll make my friend a scarf instead of an afghan for Christmas.

Jack and I shop local, but we once made a pact that we would not buy anything at Walmart unless we couldn’t find it after a week of trying elsewhere, and gave up after about 10 days. We needed a picture frame, and nobody sells them anymore, except specialty ones in Hallmark (a locally owned franchise).

So we’re not sticklers. Jack once read me excerpts from a book called The McDonaldization of Society, in which the author divided people into iron cagers, rubber cagers, and free-rangers. Iron cagers shopped for the cheapest or most convenient thing, without thinking of its impact or consequences except to them (money and time) in the short term. Rubber cagers tried to buy things from local providers before chain stores (local franchises are not chain stores in my mind, btw) and generally made purchases based on their carbon footprint and what they considered fair treatment of those who produced the item.

The sad point of the book was that free rangers–those who swear they will DO NO HARM, grow their own food, spin their own cloth, etc–cannot be completely free if they live in a developed nation. It’s impossible. (And if they live in a developing one, that’s just called “daily living.”)

Still, as that author pointed out, rubber caging is better than nothing, and every little bit helps–or at least slows the crash and tumble that economic or environmental disaster historically bring. So Jack and I aspire to bounce off the bars of uninformed choices every chance we get. Boing! It’s kinda fun, actually, to plot one’s way out of the path of least resistance, and surprisingly inexpensive. Bet you know a local crafter who doesn’t even have a shop; a little stuffed-to-the-gills “junk” store somewhere on your town’s side streets; even a service store that would do a gift certificate if you asked them.

Boing… this is kinda fun… boing….

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Filed under Big Stone Gap, book repair, folklore and ethnography, humor, small town USA, VA